Brot für die Welt hilft den Carterets

In der ZDF-Nachrichtensendung heute lief heute ein Beitrag über die Carteret-Inseln (Video) mit einer guten Nachricht. Die deutsche evangelische Hilfsorganisation Brot für die Welt engagiert sich für die Menschen der Carteret-Inseln, wie ihr Entwicklungspoliticher Beauftragter Thomas Hirsch erläutert:

“Wir unterstützen die Bewohner sowohl finanziell wie auch durch Beratung. So können auf einem Gelände, das die Kirche auf der Nachbarinsel Bougainville zur Verfügung stellt, beispielsweise Häuser für die ersten Familien erstellt werden. Darüber hinaus unterstützen wir die Inselbewohner darin, ihre politischen Anliegen besser durchzusetzen.

Das im Beitrag verwendete Filmmaterial stammte von uns.

Thomas Hirsch im ZDF-Interview (Screenshot)
Bread for the World is supporting the Carterets

Today Heute, the main news show of German public broadcaster ZDF, aired a report on the plight of the Carteret Islands (video). It brought some good news though: German relief organisation Bread for the World (BFTW) is now helping the people of the Carterets.

We are supporting the islanders financially as well as through consultancy. For example, houses for families can be built on an site provided by the [catholic] church on the neighbouring island Bougainville. We also helping the islanders in reaching their political goals.

says Thomas Hirsch, Head of Development Policy of BFTW.

The footage used in the news report was shot by us during our trip to the Carterets.

 

Weitere Links

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Sieben weitere Familien haben die Carterets verlassen

Radio Australia berichtet, dass sieben weitere Familien inzwischen die Carteret-Inseln verlassen haben und auf dem Umsiedelungsgelände in Tinputz leben.

Als nächster Schritt sollen drei Familien umgesiedelt werden, dann auf ein zweites Gelände, erzählt Ursula Rakova im Interview mit ABC. Auf diese Informationen stützt sich auch ein italienischer Bericht bei L’espresso.

Seven more families relocated to Tinputz

Seven more families have left the Carterets and are now living on the relocation site in Tinputz, Ursula Rakova of Tulele Peisa told Radio Australia. There’s now a total of 83 people living there. Tulele Peisa is planning to erect houses for three more families. After that, further relocation will go to a second site on Bougainville also provided by the catholic church.

L’espresso of Italy was also reporting on the issue.

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Abschluss des UN-Klimagipfels in Durban

Ein “Weltklimavertrag soll kommen – aber erst 2020″, berichtet tagesschau.de.

Und die schlechte Nachricht ist: In diesem Jahrzehnt hat es keine konkreten Folgen. Der neu angepeilte Vertrag auf dem UN-Klimagipfel in Durban ist ein “zahnloser Tiger”, kommentiert SWR-Redakteur Werner Eckert. “Die Klimaretter haben sich verrannt”, sagt Christian Schwägerl im Kommentar bei Spiegel Online und nennt viele Punkte, über die es sich mehr zu sprechen lohnen, als nur über Kohlendioxid-Reduzierungen zu handeln. Die BBC betrachtet Gewinner und Verlierer der Konferenz – und sieht auch die Allinanz der kleinen Inselstaaten (AOSIS) auf der Haben-Seite.

Auf der offiziellen Seite der Klimakonferenz gibt es augenscheinlich noch kein Dokument zum Ergebnis. Sie sieht auf den ersten Blick noch so aus wie zu Beginn der Konferenz.

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Durban: Klimagipfel der dürren Hoffnungen

Vor dem Klimagipfel in Kopenhagen 2009 herrschte wenn nicht Euphorie, so doch Energie. Von der jetzigen UN-Konferenz in Durban bekommt man als Nicht-Beteiligter so gut wie gar nichts mit. Große Hoffnungen verbindet niemand mit dem Ausgang des Gipfels – obwohl doch so viel von Einigung und einschneidenden Maßnahmen abhängt.“Klimagipfel warum?”, fragt SWR-Umweltfachmann Werner Eckert.

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Carteret-Inseln: Die Foto-Reportage

Ausgewählte Bilder aus der Foto-Reportage von Sebastian Lasse, 2009 im “Klima Magazin” erschienen, ist jetzt bei Picasa zu betrachten (mehr Fotos hinter dem Link).

Reportage #1 Carteret Now!

Reportage #1 Carteret Now!
[english, scroll down for german text]

*Expelled from paradise*

Stanley holds the chicken in one of his arms. Like his own baby. 
Very gently the lanky man scoops some rainwater in the beak. The hen’s head hangs down. It lost all the strength in its muscles. Stanley waits for a reaction. He tries again to instill some water and remains waiting. It seems like he does not have the heart to feed it again.  He slowly lifts up the chicken and points it towards his head. Stanley presses his ear against the chicken’s heart. Suddenly all the strength in Stanley’s muscles seems to disappear. His arm and his hand, desperately clutching the chicken, dangle. The corners of his mouth dangle too.

After a long three seconds his eyes reflect the sad truth. Stanley looks up to his nephew and shakes his head briefly. The chicken is dead. Three remaining food sources of the extended family have just gone forever. Coconuts and fish are everything that is left.
It has not rained for a long time, and the rainwater tanks are empty. 
On the atoll, there is too little water to drink. To drown, there is enough though. 
The six Carteret Islands Han, Huene, Piul, Yesila, Yolasa and Iangain will be uninhabitable by 2015 - flooded by the rising level of the Pacific. 

Stanley disappears with his nephew and the chicken behind a small hut on the island Han. The two want to bury the body-according to catholic rituals.
In the beginning of the early sixties, the german missionary Adam Muller arrived on the Island of Bougainville. He had converted other tribes of Papua New Guinea before. In Bougainville the padre is surrounded by red blooming bougainvilleas. The color of the blossoms seems to remind of the blood that was shed during the nineties in the civil war. The war started when people were fighting each other over a copper mine, lasted for nine years and ended in 1997.
 About15, 000 people died, almost unnoticed by the international press.

In 1961, when the German priest set out from Bougainville to the Carteret atoll, nothing indicated an upcoming war. Carteret was supposed to be his last stop. 
In his luggage he kept his stole and the altar wine as well as an oversized mallet to kill poisonous spiders. At that stage, Adam Muller, the strict Catholic priest, was facing the last and most dangerous part of his journey:
In the provincial capital Buka he boarded a canoe, made from a palm tree. He travelled about 86 km in a “nutshell”, surrounded by the open Pacific Ocean. 
A whole day on the water. Surrounded by nothing. 
When he arrived on the atoll, Adam must have felt like having found paradise on earth. 

At that time the Carteret Islands were fantastically beautiful hideaways: 
White and vast sandy beaches and tropical gardens fringed the shores of the 
Atoll. 
Behind the beaches, majestic palm trees were facing towards heaven, reflecting
on the calm sea, in the turquoise waters of the Pacific.
 Adam Muller took his job very seriously. He got a rectory, a church and a school built and was teaching there from then on. In the evenings he wrote parts of his “German to Handia”-dictionary. Handia is the language of the Han, one of today’s 800 languages in Papua New Guinea. Padre Adam also translated parts of the Bible into Handia. 

The parsonage is now abandoned. The original handwritten notes of Adam Muller's translation of the Bible are are still lying on a shelf, made of rough wooden planks. 
Some cockroaches seem to browse the vocabulary. 
Muddy saltwater pushes from below against the rotting wooden beams. Today, the palm trees are overturned by a sea of mud. Gardens and beaches have already sunk. 
The new priest, who visits the island from time to time, calls the atoll "the forgotten 
islands". 
The Pacific Ocean takes all the land. By 2015, the rising sea level will destroy the first 2,000 people’s existences. They will be the first real climate refugees worldwide. The ocean destroys the home of the Carteret inhabitants - each emission a bit more.

A paradise of six enchanted islands, that form an atoll in crystal clear water, will then be extinct. 

"We feel like a root which is losing its ground." Ursula Rakova tries to put the emotional world of the islanders. into words. The Pacific Communities such as the Carteret are extremely influenced by places. In the isolated Polynesian cultures, an island is part of the inhabitants’ identity.

The burly, cheerful Ursula complains: "For more than ten years, we have been building protective barriers  against the water. But the ocean is more powerful than we are. Ursula was born on Huene. She visited the school in Han, but left the atoll afterwards. She studied sociology on the mainland and worked for Charity Organizations. Now she has returned to the Atoll to organize the relocation of the population.
For this purpose, she founded the aid organization “Tulele Peisa” with the help of the islands’ eldest.
It runs on a private basis because the authorities help is limited so far. The State of Papua New Guinea and the Government of the Autonomous Region of Bougainville hand over responsibilities for the fate of the Carterets again and again.
Ursula Rakova desperately tries to find money and land. 
Each of the islanders pays one kina, equivalent to 37 cent, towards the "Carteret Trust Fund” for the evacuation. For the individual thirty-seven cents are a fair bit of money. For the resettlement of 2,000 people, it is not enough though. 
The name of the organization "Tulele Peisa" means "we sail through the ocean alone. " 
If, in case of the international climate change, entire islands like Kiribati have to be relocated, about 90.000 inhabitants will be affected.

In Ursula's office on Buka, the neighbouring island of Bougainville, everybody is aware of the fact that the resettlements have to take place very quickly. 
Weather-proof foils lie on approximately seven square meters, between a typewriter and two historical computers. Together with a friend Ursula carries them to the shore. Lawrence, the big skipper, waits there in his little 60-horsepower motor boat to transport the posters to the another island.
On numerous tribal meetings “Tulele Peisa” explains the inhabitants the consequences of world-wide climate change and points out the reasons for the rise of the ocean. They realize, who is to blame for the air-pollution -the western industrial nations,-and get an idea of how their evacuation might take place.

After five hours the boat reaches the reef that protects the atoll from the open Ocean.
A few days later on Han: the big posters are now hanging on a washing line. They show pictures of environmental destruction, fish mortality and, graphs of global warming. Leonard explains everything in detail. He is now heading the school that Father Muller founded. Children can attend the school up to the eighth grade. 
Leonhard’s knowledge about global warming is limited, but greater than that of 
most others on the islands. 
Seventy islanders sit on the sand in front of the posters and listen intently. 
A teenager is wearing a discarded T-shirt with the slogan "I don‘t fool with fuel. 

Aside, Bernhard leans on a bended tree next to a toothless old man, who carries one of these lottery-ticket seller glasses. They seem to consist of bulletproof glass. The toothless grins. He is one of the eldest of the island and is no longer interested in the future. He is one who wants to sink with the island. Bernhard, however, seems to be wide awake. 
He is politically involved in the Council of the Elders. He holds a rake in his hand, with which he raked the beach before the “Awareness Meeting”. Suddenly he flies off the handle: “We need the open ears of your government. We need your Assistance, modern technology from the powerful industrial states, such as Germany, America, England and Russia. People have great towers, they send astronauts to the moon and a lot of money is wasted. We heard that millions are spent to kill people in Iraq. And now the developed countries can also spend a few million to help the victims of climate change. You burn the oil! We have no factories and no cars. The Dutch and the Japanese also get their land back from the sea. Is there nothing that can be done - simply nothing to recreate our paradise?”
Bernhard grabs his rake and takes it to his small hut, hammered together with raw wood, covered by palm leafs. 
The extemporaneous huts are gathered in one corner of the jungle. Only helpless individual accumulations of large shells separate them from the waves of the Pacific, that looks so peaceful but has become such a threat.

Organized measures by Bernhard, such as building the protection wall out of shells, seem helpless against the powerful effects of nature. The stubble-bearded man with the big, bright eyes puts the rake into a rusty BP kerosene barrel, which probably comes from one of the ship wrecks that have run aground on one of the sunken islands.
He runs barefoot into the jungle. The mud slurps with each step. In the background, the water nibbles some Rocky cliffs.
"This is the lowest area of the island. Bananas and other fruits used to grow 
here. It all started, when the water came in, as if nothing could stop it. When people wanted to save their bananas they came with canoes. We were frightened, because sharks and stingrays used to swim among the trees." 

Huene is the first island of the atoll, which has been completely split, only two families are still here: On Huene One, as it is called now. The central part of the island is flooded with water. The beaches on the other islands have disappeared to a large extent. Only the jungles and populated areas poke out of the water, just one meter above sea level. The vegetable gardens, which were located next to wide beaches, are now serving the Pacific as a convenient ground
. 
The soil of the remaining area is too salty and because of their poison the palm’s roots stop agricultural crops from

Reportage #1 Carteret Now! [english, scroll down for german text] *Expelled from paradise* Stanley holds the chicken in one of his arms. Like his own baby. Very gently the lanky man scoops some rainwater in the beak. The hen’s head hangs down. It lost all the strength in its muscles. Stanley waits for a reaction. He tries again to instill some water and remains waiting. It seems like he does not have the heart to feed it again. He slowly lifts up the chicken and points it towards his head. Stanley presses his ear against the chicken’s heart. Suddenly all the strength in Stanley’s muscles seems to disappear. His arm and his hand, desperately clutching the chicken, dangle. The corners of his mouth dangle too. After a long three seconds his eyes reflect the sad truth. Stanley looks up to his nephew and shakes his head briefly. The chicken is dead. Three remaining food sources of the extended family have just gone forever. Coconuts and fish are everything that is left. It has not rained for a long time, and the rainwater tanks are empty. On the atoll, there is too little water to drink. To drown, there is enough though. The six Carteret Islands Han, Huene, Piul, Yesila, Yolasa and Iangain will be uninhabitable by 2015 - flooded by the rising level of the Pacific. Stanley disappears with his nephew and the chicken behind a small hut on the island Han. The two want to bury the body-according to catholic rituals. In the beginning of the early sixties, the german missionary Adam Muller arrived on the Island of Bougainville. He had converted other tribes of Papua New Guinea before. In Bougainville the padre is surrounded by red blooming bougainvilleas. The color of the blossoms seems to remind of the blood that was shed during the nineties in the civil war. The war started when people were fighting each other over a copper mine, lasted for nine years and ended in 1997. About15, 000 people died, almost unnoticed by the international press. In 1961, when the German priest set out from Bougainville to the Carteret atoll, nothing indicated an upcoming war. Carteret was supposed to be his last stop. In his luggage he kept his stole and the altar wine as well as an oversized mallet to kill poisonous spiders. At that stage, Adam Muller, the strict Catholic priest, was facing the last and most dangerous part of his journey: In the provincial capital Buka he boarded a canoe, made from a palm tree. He travelled about 86 km in a “nutshell”, surrounded by the open Pacific Ocean. A whole day on the water. Surrounded by nothing. When he arrived on the atoll, Adam must have felt like having found paradise on earth. At that time the Carteret Islands were fantastically beautiful hideaways: White and vast sandy beaches and tropical gardens fringed the shores of the Atoll. Behind the beaches, majestic palm trees were facing towards heaven, reflecting on the calm sea, in the turquoise waters of the Pacific. Adam Muller took his job very seriously. He got a rectory, a church and a school built and was teaching there from then on. In the evenings he wrote parts of his “German to Handia”-dictionary. Handia is the language of the Han, one of today’s 800 languages in Papua New Guinea. Padre Adam also translated parts of the Bible into Handia. The parsonage is now abandoned. The original handwritten notes of Adam Muller's translation of the Bible are are still lying on a shelf, made of rough wooden planks. Some cockroaches seem to browse the vocabulary. Muddy saltwater pushes from below against the rotting wooden beams. Today, the palm trees are overturned by a sea of mud. Gardens and beaches have already sunk. The new priest, who visits the island from time to time, calls the atoll "the forgotten islands". The Pacific Ocean takes all the land. By 2015, the rising sea level will destroy the first 2,000 people’s existences. They will be the first real climate refugees worldwide. The ocean destroys the home of the Carteret inhabitants - each emission a bit more. A paradise of six enchanted islands, that form an atoll in crystal clear water, will then be extinct. "We feel like a root which is losing its ground." Ursula Rakova tries to put the emotional world of the islanders. into words. The Pacific Communities such as the Carteret are extremely influenced by places. In the isolated Polynesian cultures, an island is part of the inhabitants’ identity. The burly, cheerful Ursula complains: "For more than ten years, we have been building protective barriers against the water. But the ocean is more powerful than we are. Ursula was born on Huene. She visited the school in Han, but left the atoll afterwards. She studied sociology on the mainland and worked for Charity Organizations. Now she has returned to the Atoll to organize the relocation of the population. For this purpose, she founded the aid organization “Tulele Peisa” with the help of the islands’ eldest. It runs on a private basis because the authorities help is limited so far. The State of Papua New Guinea and the Government of the Autonomous Region of Bougainville hand over responsibilities for the fate of the Carterets again and again. Ursula Rakova desperately tries to find money and land. Each of the islanders pays one kina, equivalent to 37 cent, towards the "Carteret Trust Fund” for the evacuation. For the individual thirty-seven cents are a fair bit of money. For the resettlement of 2,000 people, it is not enough though. The name of the organization "Tulele Peisa" means "we sail through the ocean alone. " If, in case of the international climate change, entire islands like Kiribati have to be relocated, about 90.000 inhabitants will be affected. In Ursula's office on Buka, the neighbouring island of Bougainville, everybody is aware of the fact that the resettlements have to take place very quickly. Weather-proof foils lie on approximately seven square meters, between a typewriter and two historical computers. Together with a friend Ursula carries them to the shore. Lawrence, the big skipper, waits there in his little 60-horsepower motor boat to transport the posters to the another island. On numerous tribal meetings “Tulele Peisa” explains the inhabitants the consequences of world-wide climate change and points out the reasons for the rise of the ocean. They realize, who is to blame for the air-pollution -the western industrial nations,-and get an idea of how their evacuation might take place. After five hours the boat reaches the reef that protects the atoll from the open Ocean. A few days later on Han: the big posters are now hanging on a washing line. They show pictures of environmental destruction, fish mortality and, graphs of global warming. Leonard explains everything in detail. He is now heading the school that Father Muller founded. Children can attend the school up to the eighth grade. Leonhard’s knowledge about global warming is limited, but greater than that of most others on the islands. Seventy islanders sit on the sand in front of the posters and listen intently. A teenager is wearing a discarded T-shirt with the slogan "I don‘t fool with fuel. Aside, Bernhard leans on a bended tree next to a toothless old man, who carries one of these lottery-ticket seller glasses. They seem to consist of bulletproof glass. The toothless grins. He is one of the eldest of the island and is no longer interested in the future. He is one who wants to sink with the island. Bernhard, however, seems to be wide awake. He is politically involved in the Council of the Elders. He holds a rake in his hand, with which he raked the beach before the “Awareness Meeting”. Suddenly he flies off the handle: “We need the open ears of your government. We need your Assistance, modern technology from the powerful industrial states, such as Germany, America, England and Russia. People have great towers, they send astronauts to the moon and a lot of money is wasted. We heard that millions are spent to kill people in Iraq. And now the developed countries can also spend a few million to help the victims of climate change. You burn the oil! We have no factories and no cars. The Dutch and the Japanese also get their land back from the sea. Is there nothing that can be done - simply nothing to recreate our paradise?” Bernhard grabs his rake and takes it to his small hut, hammered together with raw wood, covered by palm leafs. The extemporaneous huts are gathered in one corner of the jungle. Only helpless individual accumulations of large shells separate them from the waves of the Pacific, that looks so peaceful but has become such a threat. Organized measures by Bernhard, such as building the protection wall out of shells, seem helpless against the powerful effects of nature. The stubble-bearded man with the big, bright eyes puts the rake into a rusty BP kerosene barrel, which probably comes from one of the ship wrecks that have run aground on one of the sunken islands. He runs barefoot into the jungle. The mud slurps with each step. In the background, the water nibbles some Rocky cliffs. "This is the lowest area of the island. Bananas and other fruits used to grow here. It all started, when the water came in, as if nothing could stop it. When people wanted to save their bananas they came with canoes. We were frightened, because sharks and stingrays used to swim among the trees." Huene is the first island of the atoll, which has been completely split, only two families are still here: On Huene One, as it is called now. The central part of the island is flooded with water. The beaches on the other islands have disappeared to a large extent. Only the jungles and populated areas poke out of the water, just one meter above sea level. The vegetable gardens, which were located next to wide beaches, are now serving the Pacific as a convenient ground . The soil of the remaining area is too salty and because of their poison the palm’s roots stop agricultural crops from

VIDEO (please be patient) : This is the trailer for our documentary "CARTERET NOW!"

VIDEO (please be patient) : This is the trailer for our documentary "CARTERET NOW!"

- 86 km offener Pazifik trennen die Carteret Inseln von der Buka Passage ziwschen Bougainville und Buka. Die Ueberfahrt geschieht in einem kleinen Bananenboot.

- 86 km offener Pazifik trennen die Carteret Inseln von der Buka Passage ziwschen Bougainville und Buka. Die Ueberfahrt geschieht in einem kleinen Bananenboot.

- Bei Flut steigt der Pazifik bis an den Rand des Dschungels. Bei Ebbe liegen Palmen umgestuerzt am Strand. Die Gaerten sind bereits im Meer versunken. Erste Klimafluechtlinge: Das gesamte Carteret Atoll wird aufgrund der Erwaermung des Meeres als erste Inselgruppe versinken. Alle sechs Inseln werden bis 2015 komplett vom Pazifik verschlungen sein. Hauptgrund: Das Abschmelzen der Gletscher und Eisberge. Die Carteret Inseln waren traumhaft schoene Refugien. Weisse Sandstraende umsaeumten einst die Kuesten des Atolls. Oberhalb der Straende reckten sich majestetische Palmen gen Himmel und spiegelten sich bei ruhiger See im tuerkisblauen Wasser des Pazifik.  Die Palmen liegen heute umgestuerzt in einem Meer aus Schlamm. Die Straende sind bereits versunken. Ende 2008 soll die Umsiedlung beginnen. Die Inselbewohner kaempfen um ihre Inseln.

- Bei Flut steigt der Pazifik bis an den Rand des Dschungels. Bei Ebbe liegen Palmen umgestuerzt am Strand. Die Gaerten sind bereits im Meer versunken. Erste Klimafluechtlinge: Das gesamte Carteret Atoll wird aufgrund der Erwaermung des Meeres als erste Inselgruppe versinken. Alle sechs Inseln werden bis 2015 komplett vom Pazifik verschlungen sein. Hauptgrund: Das Abschmelzen der Gletscher und Eisberge. Die Carteret Inseln waren traumhaft schoene Refugien. Weisse Sandstraende umsaeumten einst die Kuesten des Atolls. Oberhalb der Straende reckten sich majestetische Palmen gen Himmel und spiegelten sich bei ruhiger See im tuerkisblauen Wasser des Pazifik. Die Palmen liegen heute umgestuerzt in einem Meer aus Schlamm. Die Straende sind bereits versunken. Ende 2008 soll die Umsiedlung beginnen. Die Inselbewohner kaempfen um ihre Inseln.

Reportage #1 Carteret Now!

Reportage #1 Carteret Now!

Veröffentlicht unter Carterets | Verschlagwortet mit , , , , , , , , | 15 Kommentare